Home Inmigracion Trump rescinds DACA program

Trump rescinds DACA program

More than 800,000 students expected to be affected
By Chara
On Tuesday (Sept. 5), U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced the Trump administration would rescind the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program.
Implemented in 2012 by the Obama administration, DACA was designed to help undocumented children get an education and offer youth renewable two-year term work authorizations. Sessions stated during a press conference, however, that DACA had contributed to a surge of unaccompanied minors on the southern border, resulting in terrible humanitarian consequences.
“It also denied jobs to hundreds of thousands of Americans by allowing those same jobs to go to illegal aliens,” he said.
Hours after the announcement, President Trump issued a statement saying: “As I’ve said before, we will resolve the DACA issue with heart and compassion – but through the lawful democratic process – while at the same time ensuring that any immigration reform we adopt provides enduring benefits for the American citizens we were elected to serve. We must also have heart and compassion for unemployed, struggling and forgotten Americans.”
To protest Trump’s decision, rallies were held in various states, including New York, Massachusetts, Colorado and Missouri. In addition, many community leaders spoke out against the decision.
“This action is not just short-sighted; it’s unspeakably cruel and gratuitous,” Janet Murguia, UnidosUS president and CEO, said in a statement. “For no plausible purpose or rationale that makes sense to anyone other than the most anti-immigrant extremists in our midst, he is saying ‘no thanks’ to young people who contribute to our country every single day. This is a travesty for our community and for our country.”
A teacher from Sedalia, Mo., commented on the decision, calling it “unfair,” “cruel” and “not right.”
“The Trump administration is denying children the opportunity to look for a better future and contribute to our country,” said the teacher, who requested anonymity. “I hope Congress finds a solution to this horrible situation we are in, and I hope the president takes … (into) consideration that these children are pure and just want to have a better a life.”
Former President Obama also reacted.
“Whatever concerns or complaints Americans may have about immigration in general, we shouldn’t threaten the future of this group of young people who are here through no fault of their own, who pose no threat, who are not taking away anything from the rest of us,” Obama said in a statement.
President Trump’s decision is expected to cut benefits to more than 800,000 students in the United States. However, current DACA holders will retain their deferred action and employment authorization until they expire, unless terminated or revoked. DACA holders whose permits expire between now and March 5, 2018, must submit their application for renewal by Oct. 5.
Moreover, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has announced that U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services will process DACA applications that were accepted through Tuesday. In addition, the DHS has stated on its website that the information provided by DACA recipients won’t be provided to U.S. Immigrations and Customs Enforcement or U.S. Customs and Border Protection for immigration enforcement proceedings, unless the requestor meets the criteria for a notice to appear issuance.
On the other hand, the DHS has announced it’ll no longer grant DACA recipients permission to travel via Advance Parole.
Congress is expected to act on Trump’s DACA decision before the March 5, 2018, deadline. Speaker of the House Paul Ryan said he hopes Congress can find a consensus on a permanent legislative solution.

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More than 800,000 students expected to be affected
By Chara
On Tuesday (Sept. 5), U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced the Trump administration would rescind the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program.
Implemented in 2012 by the Obama administration, DACA was designed to help undocumented children get an education and offer youth renewable two-year term work authorizations. Sessions stated during a press conference, however, that DACA had contributed to a surge of unaccompanied minors on the southern border, resulting in terrible humanitarian consequences.
“It also denied jobs to hundreds of thousands of Americans by allowing those same jobs to go to illegal aliens,” he said.
Hours after the announcement, President Trump issued a statement saying: “As I’ve said before, we will resolve the DACA issue with heart and compassion – but through the lawful democratic process – while at the same time ensuring that any immigration reform we adopt provides enduring benefits for the American citizens we were elected to serve. We must also have heart and compassion for unemployed, struggling and forgotten Americans.”
To protest Trump’s decision, rallies were held in various states, including New York, Massachusetts, Colorado and Missouri. In addition, many community leaders spoke out against the decision.
“This action is not just short-sighted; it’s unspeakably cruel and gratuitous,” Janet Murguia, UnidosUS president and CEO, said in a statement. “For no plausible purpose or rationale that makes sense to anyone other than the most anti-immigrant extremists in our midst, he is saying ‘no thanks’ to young people who contribute to our country every single day. This is a travesty for our community and for our country.”
A teacher from Sedalia, Mo., commented on the decision, calling it “unfair,” “cruel” and “not right.”
“The Trump administration is denying children the opportunity to look for a better future and contribute to our country,” said the teacher, who requested anonymity. “I hope Congress finds a solution to this horrible situation we are in, and I hope the president takes … (into) consideration that these children are pure and just want to have a better a life.”
Former President Obama also reacted.
“Whatever concerns or complaints Americans may have about immigration in general, we shouldn’t threaten the future of this group of young people who are here through no fault of their own, who pose no threat, who are not taking away anything from the rest of us,” Obama said in a statement.
President Trump’s decision is expected to cut benefits to more than 800,000 students in the United States. However, current DACA holders will retain their deferred action and employment authorization until they expire, unless terminated or revoked. DACA holders whose permits expire between now and March 5, 2018, must submit their application for renewal by Oct. 5.
Moreover, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has announced that U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services will process DACA applications that were accepted through Tuesday. In addition, the DHS has stated on its website that the information provided by DACA recipients won’t be provided to U.S. Immigrations and Customs Enforcement or U.S. Customs and Border Protection for immigration enforcement proceedings, unless the requestor meets the criteria for a notice to appear issuance.
On the other hand, the DHS has announced it’ll no longer grant DACA recipients permission to travel via Advance Parole.
Congress is expected to act on Trump’s DACA decision before the March 5, 2018, deadline. Speaker of the House Paul Ryan said he hopes Congress can find a consensus on a permanent legislative solution.

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